Modal Mania: Employability abilities: Can you speak English?

Employability SkillsAccording to a well-respected international business magazine, the most important abilities that employers want from their employees are transferable skills.  For example, employers want people who:

  1. Can work in a team structure
  2. Can make decisions and solve problems with little supervision
  3. Can communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organisation
  4. Can plan, organise and prioritise work independently
  5. Can obtain and process information
  6. Can analyse quantitative data
  7. Can use computer software programmes
  8. Can create and/or edit written reports
  9. Can sell and influence others
  10. Can think for themselves
  11. Can adapt to new ideas, systems and processes

So, what do you think? Do you agree with the opinions of this magazine? And, as importantly, do you have any of the above abilities?

Experientially speaking, I can’t work in a team structure, I’m brilliant at making decisions but they aren’t always the right ones, I’m hooked on planning and organising, but I couldn’t sell an igloo to an Inuit.  So, in a nutshell, it’s a good job I’m self-employed.

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Modal Mania: Employability abilities: Can you?

Employability SkillsAccording to the American business magazine, Forbes, the most important abilities or skills that employers want are as follows:
1. Can work in a team structure
2. Can make decisions and solve problems
3. Can communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organisation
4. Can plan, organise and prioritise work
5. Can obtain and process information
6. Can analyse quantitative data
7. Technical knowledge related to the job
8. Proficiency with computer software programmes
9. Can create and/or edit written reports
10. Can sell and influence others

So, do you have the above abilities?  Do you agree?

Experientially speaking, I can’t work in a team structure, I’m brilliant at making decisions but they aren’t always the right ones, I’m hooked on planning and organising but I couldn’t sell an igloo to an Inuit.  So, in a nutshell, it’s a good job I’m self-employed.

To make a pig’s ear of something!

Make a pig's ear“Make a pig’s ear of something” means “to do something badly”.

For example: As I am not a very practical person and definitely lack basic d.i.y skills, I always make a pig’s ear of painting, decorating, fixing the washing machine, hanging  pictures and assembling anything that I might have bought from Ikea.  How about you, what do you make a pig’s ear of?

 

Educational challenge: Learn a new skill

How hard can throwing knives be?

Learning something new can be very enjoyable. Often, you get to know new people, exercise your brain in a different way and have fun at the same time. Brilliant challenge, how hard can this be?!

So, what should I learn?

My boyfriend, who obviously doesn’t know me very well,  has suggested the following: cooking, cleaning, sewing, ironing and dusting. However,  I told him that he should start to learn how to use his brain more. Seriously, as if I’m going to learn any of those ‘domestic’ skills!!

Anyway, as I’m looking for a flat to buy, I think I need to learn some practical skills like rewiring a plug, hanging a picture or  fixing a leaking tap.  Generally speaking, I need to be better at  D.I.Y ( do it yourself).  What do you think?

More importantly, do you know of a flat for sale in the historical centre that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg?

D.I.Y: Do it yourself!

diy skillsD.I.Y is an acronym which stands for: ‘Do it yourself’’. The acronym is usually connected to non-expert home repairs and if you want to save money, then learning this type of skill should be at the top of your ‘to do’ list. Worryingly, I have zero d.i.y skills.  So, if anyone would like to teach me some practical skills, my door is wide open!