Phrasal Verbs: Off

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To drink up

wat-aah-drinkupTo drink up is a phrasal verb used to express the idea of drinking the very last drop of a drink.

For example, because my brother is very talkative, indeed he’s a complete chatterbox or as they say in Yorkshire, a chatty catty, I’m always asking him to drink up so I can order another round of drinks at the bar. Interestingly, my mother never has this problem with wine as she’s usually drunk up before anyone has even taken their first sip. What an alcoholic!

To get away

getaway hen partyTo get away is a phrasal verb which means to escape, to break free or to leave. 

It can be used in the context of taking a trip or a holiday as well as the idea of escaping or fleeing something or somebody. 

For example, a lot of people get away at Christmas time to visit their relatives in different cities or different countries.  Indeed, I’m getting away during the festive season.

Getaway EscapeAnd, despite the fact that James Bond, 007, often gets caught by the baddies, he always manages to get away in order to save the plant and the girl!

By the way, getaway is a noun, which means a trip or a holiday.  For example, two weekends ago I went on an adventure getaway to Tarifa.

To fall for

Its-Easy-to-fall-For-SomeoneTo fall for is a phrasal verb with two main meanings. It can be used when a person is deceived by something. For example, I’m a little naïve and I often fall for tricks my friends play on me.

In addition, it can be used to describe the emotion of being in love. For example, I first fell for Mr George Clooney when I saw him on the hit TV series, ER, and now I fall for him every time I see him in a film or on a commercial.

Seriously, man, woman or vegetable, who can’t fall for those dreamy eyes, that silky voice and his masculine sophistication. As they say in The States, ‘it’s a no-brainer’. I know, I’m so predictable!