Modal Mania: Employability abilities: Can you speak English?

Employability SkillsAccording to a well-respected international business magazine, the most important abilities that employers want from their employees are transferable skills.  For example, employers want people who:

  1. Can work in a team structure
  2. Can make decisions and solve problems with little supervision
  3. Can communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organisation
  4. Can plan, organise and prioritise work independently
  5. Can obtain and process information
  6. Can analyse quantitative data
  7. Can use computer software programmes
  8. Can create and/or edit written reports
  9. Can sell and influence others
  10. Can think for themselves
  11. Can adapt to new ideas, systems and processes

So, what do you think? Do you agree with the opinions of this magazine? And, as importantly, do you have any of the above abilities?

Experientially speaking, I can’t work in a team structure, I’m brilliant at making decisions but they aren’t always the right ones, I’m hooked on planning and organising, but I couldn’t sell an igloo to an Inuit.  So, in a nutshell, it’s a good job I’m self-employed.

Advertisements

I want a good job!

Factors important in a job

I want a good job?

OK, but seriously, who wants to have a bad job?! So, with this in mind, what does it mean to have a good job?  Have you ever considered what makes a good job? Is it more than just the salary and the holiday allowance?
From this list of key factors, how would you rate their level of importance? You might want to consider:

  1. Which three aspects are the most important for you, and why?
  2. Whether your thoughts have changed from when you were younger?
  3. Whether you think they will change when you are older?

What´s the job?

Essential qualifications and experience  

  1. IT and digital skills, including Outlook and Word;
  2. Strong interpersonal and customer focus skills;
  3. Ability to work in a team;
  4. Initiative and the ability to organise and prioritise own workload;
  5. Creativity and ability to come up with new, innovative ideas;
  6. Adaptability under pressure;
  7. Good communications skills (written and oral);
  8. Ability to grasp complex issues quickly and communicate them simply and effectively;
  9. Fluent written and spoken English;

Desirable qualifications and experience  

  1. Experience in communications, including communications campaigns;
  2. Experience and/or interest in International Relations;
  3. IT and digital skills in social media;
  4. Programme management.

Why do governments invest so little in education and training?

The most recent records that I can find on the Internet allege that Spain spends 4.21% of its GDP on Education, in comparison to the UK which spends 5.73%, and Norway which spends 7.37%.

OK, obviously, we need to understand exactly what these Education budgets include, but, the next time a politician says: ‘‘Education is the key to economic prosperity and better living’‘, we need to challenge them, and ask them what they mean by education, and better living for whom.

Finally, if you are curious as to which country invests the most of its GDP on education, then check it out here. And, if you don´t believe that these statistics are true, who can you ask to get the right information?

Why journalists have an obligation to challenge power

”You can kick Jorge Ramos out of your press conference (as Donald Trump infamously did in 2015), but you can never silence him.

A reporter for more than 30 years, Ramos believes that a journalist’s responsibility is to question and challenge those in power. In this compelling talk — which earned him a standing ovation midway through — Ramos explains why, in certain circumstances, he believes journalists must take sides.” (In Spanish with English subtitles)

To understand autism, don´t look the other way.

”Carina Morillo knew almost nothing about autism when her son Ivan was diagnosed — only that he didn’t speak or respond to words, and that she had to find other ways to connect with him. She shares how she learned to help her son thrive by being curious along with him.”(In Spanish with English subtitles)

Be inspired: Why women stay silent after sexual assault

Be inspired, be curious, be open-minded.  It´s easy to feel inspired when you surround yourself with inspirational people.  Listen to Ted Talks presentations to improve your English vocabulary, open your mind to different points of view, and to strengthen your ability to listen, think, analyse and debate.

Inés Hercovich talks about why so many women don´t report sexual assault. Spanish with English subtitles.